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in washington. it ended with the reelection of barack obama. if you could think of adjectives, what would they be to describe these seven years? >> interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. full of opportunities for the country. there were good times during these 12 years, laced together with some that were not so good. 9/11. the anthrax scare. there were also positive things. the election of barack obama i thought was a very positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way out of a fiscal of this. abyss.thi i could not have imagined a better time to have been here with all of the things that have happened. >> let me ask you to look back over those 12 years and ask what the high point was. >> when we could work together. maybe the single event that would and body that is the gang of 14. john mccain and i put together six other democrats and six other republicans to avoid what was then called the nuclear option, changing the rules, turning the senate into a smaller version of the house, where the rights of the minority caucus are ignored. consequently, we were
to push without delay. this is not some washington commission. this is not something where folks are going to be studying the issue for six months and publishing a report that gets read and then pushed aside. this is a team that has a very specific task, to pull together real reforms right now. i asked joe to lead this effort in part because he wrote the 1994 crime bill that helped law enforcement bring down the rate of violent crime in this country. that plan -- that bill also included the assault weapons ban that was publicly supported at the time by former presidents including ronald reagan. the good news is there's already a growing consensus for us to build from. a majority of americans support banning the sale of military- style assault weapons. a majority of americans support banning the sale of high- capacity ammunition clips. a majority of americans support laws requiring background checks before all gun purchases, so that criminals can't take advantage of legal loopholes to buy a gun from somebody who won't take the responsibility of doing a background check at all. i urge the ne
. it is a process -- people think of a filibuster in "mr. smith goes to washington." i think we should have those rules in place to change it so mr. smith stays on the floor during the filibuster. it does not just run time against the senate. it does not make any sense. if somebody feels strongly enough that they want to bring the senate to a halt, they should be willing to stay there on the floor and explain why, and i think it would be self- enforcing if people would be less likely to. people look at the senate and cannot work together, cannot get anything done, and one person wants their pay to be docked. >> any other reforms or tuneups? >> if somebody put a hold on it, you could not find out who did it. secret holds on nominees. once you put a hold on them, that was it. that was wrong. we have cleaned up the rules in many different ways. you would have a 60-vote threshold to do some like that. the people back home cannot understand that. they should not accept it. >> what about the lowest point? >> as part of the affordable care at, i tried to get medicaid for the expansion of medicaid, to ta
installing caps there without raising rates? >> i will play the think- tanker-inside-washington card, and go back to what is not possibly achievable and then come back to that. if you think about from an economic perspective, the hierarchy of the best ways to raise more revenue, the first senator mentioned baker, but people earlier mentioned this is undoubtedly the best way to raise additional revenue if you can find a way to do that. we talk about growth inside the fiscal discussion. we should not lose track of the fact that there are other things we can do as a nation to encourage growth, and an obvious one is to think about intelligent immigration reform. that has significant fiscal impact that is outside the box of these discussions and should be brought back in. the second is, and this is the other thing outside the box, the next best way to raise revenue is to tax things you do not like. to the extent we're worried about climate change and carbon emissions, doing something like a carbon tax is an attractive place to look for revenue. next most attractive is consumption tax, value-added
commentator once observed the political culture in washington. some men seek power and influence in order to be somebody. real men seek power and influence in order to be a blessing. i am blessed to welcome him to address this. [applause] >> wow. man. thank you, bob. i met him when i was 23 years old in wisconsin. i was introduced to him by my mentor, jack kemp. jimmy, your family, and you for caring on the torch. quick you close your eyes, you think you are listening to -- if you close your eyes, you think you are listening to jack kemp. it is something that is really a great honor to do this, to be here. back in this room like last year, and i want to say congratulations to marco rubio on receiving this well deserved honor. [applause] now, as you may know, marco is joining an elite group of past recipients for this award. [laughter] two of us so far. i will see you at the reunion dinner. [applause] [laughter] i am sure the press will not read too much into that one. [laughter] i want to thank you all for your kind hospitality. i want to thank you, jimmy, for holding this event. wherever
-- this is a man who really needs no introduction here in washington but has been a great friend to bgov over the years. i would be remiss if i did not give his full official title -- he is the director of federal government affairs at deloitte. please join me in welcoming congressman tom davis. [applause] >> thank you. and most importantly, i left congress undefeated and unindicted. on behalf of deloitte, i want to thank our all-star panel. senator corker, governor pawlenty, congressman van hollen, senator warner, for participating. and of course our all-star moderator, al hunt, giving up his birthday to be here. we appreciate that. this is hopefully the first of many events that deloitte will be partnering with bloomberg government. at deloitte, we are particularly invested in it solving the fiscal cliff. our ceo has met with the president and other ceo's to discuss the impending crisis. we even published their own study on the deficit, copies of which are available here today. we look forward to continuing this conversation, keeping the dialogue on going for the next month is critical if w
of the fiscal cliff on state budgets. >> wednesday on, "washington journal," ongoing negotiations on the so-called fiscal cliff. then, we hear from the associated press on how congressional leaders plan to handle social security as part of the talks. later, more on the role of social security ahead with the aarp and the heritage foundation. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the white house was very controversial, as most things in america were. the man who designed washington city -- there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly odd inspiring. in fact, in 1821, a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor on inspiring. -- awe-inspiring. the congressman answered, the building served its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> a former new york times book critic has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. what sunday evening, at 7:30 eastern and pacific, on american history tv. >>
washington city, there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly are inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor of inspiring. but the answer. the congressman dave said, the building served a purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become a permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite photos in the president's home and photographs and history. watch at 7:30 on american history tv. john boehner's office described a meeting with president obama as a frank talk. he spoke to reporters about fiscal cliff negotiations, criticizing president obama for not being serious on cutting spending and lending herrmann the lack of an agreement. lawmakers have less than three weeks before the bush era tax cuts are set to expire and mandatory spending cuts take effect. this is about 10 minutes. >> good morning, everyone. more than five weeks ago, republicans signaled our willingness to avert the fiscal cliff with a bipartisan ag
the dead, to listen to the living, and to see that this does not happen again. >> in washington, he discusses the inspiration for his trip and his meetings with bomb survivors. >> several governors met with president obama tuesday to discuss the soda ash called fiscal cliff and its impact on states and the economy. -- the so-called fiscal clef. members of the national governors' association spoke to reporters but the white house for about 15 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. i am the chair of the national governors' association, the governor of the telephone, -- of delaware, joined by the governor of oklahoma, the vice chair. and we are also joined by the governors of wisconsin and arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say it was a very good meeting with the president. the issues we face as governors and states are considered as part of the discussions going on in washington. the president was very open. we talked about some of the issues we focus on as governors, one of those same opportunities for flexibility, in terms of some of the p
, i have to get to washington to convey the thoughts and the minds of my constituents not only the average citizens but doctors who i sat down with yesterday to ask about this question. but here's my point. now you can look at'9" globally, then i'm going to narrow it down. globally one would say that we're living longer. of course women are -- this is the actuarial genius here. you know the actuarial table you teal with. women are living longer, it's always been a tradition, etc., but the body politic is living longer maybe because they're healthier. that is not the case in the span of what we're speaking of. what we're talking about tpwhreblely or nationally are people who -- whose beginnings are different, whose lifestyles were different, now i don't know that the family farmer, and i'm not picking on that group of people, they work with their hands. of course they work with their minds, they have to have a budget, mange things work but they're in the outdoors. foresters. some would say that's a healthy lifestyle. i don't know if if -- until you walk a mile in their shoes. th
amendment rights of the constitution. host: there is this headline in "the washington post" this morning. host: does that need to be looked at as well? guest: we had much more of a country that still restricted alcohol after prohibition four decades ago. that is one reason atf has fewer agents. canada tried to register the firearms and tried for over 10 years and finally dropped it. that didn't work out. i am not saying we shouldn't keep better records. fbi and other agencies should look at the background of everyone. i am not an expert in all these areas. having this debate where everybody blames the gun and everybody says it is the people involved on the other side, that is too simplistic. we have to put everything on the table. we can debate everything. we should debate our mental health situation. connecticut does not allow forced medication for people that are mentally ill. and our gun-free zone policy, which obviously has not worked. host: "the washington post" also notes -- host: joe from maryland. caller: my name is joe and i'm watching this on the news and everything. i make vie
and effort of reining in spending and -- in washington. i'm proud of our efforts to introduce the first bipartisan budget in a generation. i want to thank steve latourette and jim cooper for their efforts and leadership on this. i also want to thank congressman quigley to co-sponsor and advance this legislation, which is based on the bipartisan simpson-bowles framework. this budget ultimately failed to pass the house, but i remain proud of our bipartisan effort for which the u.s.a. today called us the brave 38. and i believe this type of thoughtful independent leadership that this is the type of leadership that the 10th district deserves. i also believe that the courage and leadership shown by the house to take on the difficult, but necessary position of reining entitlement spending deserves recognition. we know that medicare stands out as a primary driver of our debt in the future. and unfortunately, this future is not so far off. with one of medicare's key programs scheduled to go bankrupt in the next 10 to 12 years, sustaining the status quo means dramatic cuts down the road on the v
meeting with president obama. and then nancy pelosi. >> friday morning on washington journal, nina olson will discuss with the impending fiscal clause means for tax filing season. and then sarah kliff discusses medicare payments. jennifer ortman and william rey, demographers. 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> as president of? begins his second term in office, what is the most important issue he should consider for 2013? >> make a short video about your message to the president. >> with your chance to win a grand prize of $5,000. $50,000 and total prizes. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> harry reid and democratic leaders spoke to reporters about the fiscal cliff negotiations. it also focused on the senate democratic agenda including hurricane sandy legislation. this is 20 minutes. >> with every passing day, the republicans are calling on john boehner to guarantee tax cuts to the middle class. today, sen. cornyn will be the second ranking republican next congress. they'll call upon john bennett to the reasonable thing. they will have this below sooner or later. those rates go up by
. senior officials in washington sure that profound responsibility. we have to reduce the risk that people face and make sure they have the resources that they need. that includes the men and women of the depomed execute he service. i have been deeply honored to serve with many of these brave men and women. they are professionals and patriots. they serve in places where there is little or no u.s. presence. i trust them with my life. it is important to recognize that our colleagues and across the department at home and abroad get it right list times for years on end on some of the top the circumstances imaginable. he cannot lose sight of that. -- we cannot lose sight of that. we have to do better. be open to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. -- we owe it to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. thousands of our colleagues are serving america in diplomatic posts around the world. we will never forget every act of terrorism and we'll never stop working to make things better and safer. the united states will keep leading and engaging around the world, including in tho
today where washington once sat, he's have that lincoln cud might be equal value of you and me. tom jefferson, who even thinks a black man should be free? that feather-headed fool would tell you that maybe a president might lie in this new baby. in this squawker, born without a rag, to hide himself, good god it makes me gag. this human spawn, born for the world to wipe its feet upon, a few years hence but now he's more helpless than the litter of a sow and oh, well. send the women folks to see nance. poor little devil. born without a chance. who became one of the greatest presidents we ever had. who passed the emancipation proclamation and made everybody free. but he didn't have a chance. then i want to say to my colleagues one more thing. and then i'll stop. and this is when you speak on the floor and i hope my colleagues will get a chance to read this because it's really important. you drop a pebble in the water, just a splash and it is gone. but there's half a hundred ripples circling on and on and on. spreading, spreading from the center, flowing on out to the sea, and there's n
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
period. host: you can continue the conversation online and tomorrow on washington journal. we'll be talking about this 7:00 a.m. eastern. you can send us your tweets and check out what others have to say at cspan.org/fiscal cliff. the news of the evening the house is out until past christmas and that's because they pulled the plan b fiscal cliff bill and speaker boehner saying he did not have the support to pass that bill. up next we will bring you some of the floor debate on the bill that did pass, the bill that did pass and replaces the spending cuts from other agencies. >> and by every small business owner looking to expand and hire. we have passed bills and put forward reforms that would save programs like social security, medicare and medicaid from certain and predictable failure. yet we cannot find cooperation mr. speaker from the white house or the other side of the aisle to help solve these problems. it is unfornl that we find ourselves in this place just 11 days from the new year. for months we have been ready and willing to work with the president to prevent the fisc
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17